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Eyes

Quote of the Day

Et il revint vers le renard :

Adieu, dit-il...

Adieu, dit le renard.  Voici mon secret.  Il est très simple : on ne voit bien qu'avec le coeur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux.

L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux, répéta le petit prince, afin de se souvenir.

C'est le temps que tu a perdu pour ta rose qui fait ta rose si importante.

C'est le temps que j'ai perdu pour ma rose... fit le petit prince, afin de se souvenir.

Les hommes on oublié cette vérité, dit le renard.  Mais tu ne dois pas l'oublier.  Tu deviens responsable pour toujours de ce que tu as apprivoisé.  Tu es responsable de ta rose...

Je suis responsable de ma rose... répéta le petit prince, afin de se souvenir.


And he went back to meet the fox.

Goodbye, he said.

Goodbye, said the fox.  And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.

What is essential is invisible to the eye, the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember.

It is the time you have spent for your rose that makes your rose so important.

It is the time I have wasted for my rose— said the little prince, so that he would be sure to remember.

Men have forgotten this truth, said the fox.  But you must not forget it.  You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.  You are responsible for your rose...

I am responsible for my rose, the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember.

― Antoine de St-Exupéry, Le Petit Prince, chapter 21
Translation from [ Tae-Hyun Kim's homepage ].

Hah...

Comments

Oh hey!

I rember reading the little prince...but in english...which part was that??

Re: Oh hey!

Now you know. :)

Mildly wonky translation...

"C'est le temps que tu a perdu pour ta rose..."
"C'est le temps que j'ai perdu pour ma rose..."

Same general idea.
So why does it end up "spent" and "wasted"?
And why does it say spent and wasted when perdu is a form of perdre, which is "to lose"?

You guys know I'm a non-native English speaker; if you can come up with a better translation, enlighten me (and any others who can't read French).

Just saying Oh, that's wrong! mildly frustrates me, especially when the translation isn't even my own (I even said so at the bottom).

I wasn't really so much trying to say "that's wrong" but moreso that I was intrigued by the change in verbs/translations.

ok let me take a stab at this one :)

~~
And he returned to the fox.

Goodbye, he said.

Goodbye, said the fox. Here is my secret. It is very simple - one cannot see well what is in the heart. The essential (important things) is invisible for the eyes.

The essential is invisible for eyes, the little prince repeated, so he could remember

It's the time you've lost for your rose that makes the rose so important.

It's the time I've lost for my rose, said the little prince, so he oculd remember.

Men, they have forgotten this truth, said the fox. But you cannot forget it. You have become responsible for always for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose....

I am responsible for my rose repeated the little prince, so he would remember.

~~
At least, that's how I read it. There's not a lot that has changed from the translation you found, really. It's just interesting how some of the passages were interpreted.

I actually own the little prince in english, if you want to see how the "professional author" interpreted that part.

sorry if I seemed picky or anything. Wasn't you, I was just intrigued by the word usage.
I read Le Petit Prince in high school.... in French. Bet you didn't know that I am near fluent in French. I lost so much of my vocabulary though :(

The passage has SO MUCH MORE meaning if you know French and can read it. I can't even tell you why. It just really does mean more.

I actually read it in Korean, and people who are fluent in all three languages (Korean, English and French) say the Korean translation is way better than the English one, 'cause Korean has way more different conjugations that can say the same thing in a lot of different tones.

So yeah, rest assured. :)

yeah, English is kind of... dumb, I guess is the word I'm thinking of. It's almost as if it is monotone. As I explore other languages, I see the variety of meaning that is hidden in there that English doesn't seem to have - at least not as much.

I believe it was my high school french teacher who told me it is always best to read any literary work in the language it was written in, because translations get tainted by the view of the translator. But then again, she was encouraging me to read Les Miserables in French. That book was so dry in some places, I didn't even finish it in English!

hope that all makes sense - it's past 1am, brain getting fuzzy.
This sort of thing is what makes translation (and also, good translation) so amazing to me.

I took a large amount of French in high school, and I read through that passage the first time in English... and the conversation above was kind of interesting to me, because... yes, perdu = to lose, but I don't think I could have translated it in a negative sense. Lose and wasted both have these negative connotations to them. But, not being absolutely fluent in French, I think it's very hard to say whether it should have had a negative connotation or not. Is Saint-exupery trying to say the time is spent with a sense of regret? A sense of happiness? Neutral? These questions make translation fascinating to me.

Of course I watch a lot of anime... and the thing that sets acceptable translation apart from excellent translation is the willingness to set aside the literal translation of a sentence for a translation that makes more sense, in context, in the translated language.

私の本を忘れちゃった! Do you say "I regretfully forgot my book!"? Or "Dammit, I forgot my book!" or even "Dammit, I left my book back there!"

So difficult.
i need to read through the book again to get a real sense of it, but you're right on the lose/wasting having negative connotations.

It's kind of like (for that section at least) it's the time you've given to the rose makes it important... the fact that someone wanted to give time to it gave it value.

Maybe I should dedicate my own lj post to this :)
That book is basically about the world leaders in and around the second world war. Each of the dudes he visits represents the various politicians. It's been a while, but stuff like the dude who counts is Roosevelt, the fox is the French Prime Minister, the drunk is Stalin (I think), etc. Weird, huh?
Maybe you should write this passage in korean too >.<